James Mayes

Archive for the ‘Conference’ Category

Sporting analogy… why Talent matters via #hrtecheurope

In Conference, Human Resources, Recruitment, Sport on March 20, 2013 at 12:30 pm

Listening to a great presentation from Mike Psenka of eThority Analytics at HRTech Europe’s spring warm up event.  He’s looking at workforce analytics, performance data and so on.

This slide looks at difference in sporting achievement between 1908 and 2012. Performance improvements over this period for high jump and 100m race were 22-23%. The impact of human evolution is demonstrably minimal. In the equipment section, the winner of the race in the second picture is missing a shoe – so equipment is not necessarily the key differentiator.  In the third section, we see the vast difference in pool available.

Strong correlation? I think so!

Talent identification

 

 

Why doesn’t HR care about disruptive technology? #hrtecheurope

In Conference, Human Resources, Recruitment, Software Development, Start-ups on October 30, 2012 at 5:49 pm

Over at HRTechEurope last week and as per the previous year, one of my highlights was the iHR contest. A handful of young tech firms with the potential to disrupt get a time-limited “pitch n demo” opportunity, with points awarded from analysts and VC’s. All obviously get some great exposure and while the winner is by no means guaranteed success, it certainly can’t hurt.

I know I can fall prone to living in a social/recruiting tech bubble and that my news feed is heavily US/UK biased.  I therefore take this as a great opportunity to look at things either from the wider HR market, or from regions which perhaps I don’t watch as carefully as I might. There were certainly a couple of competitors who stood out for me:

  • IntuneX of Finland have some fascinating ideas which I want to research further
  • ScioMino (home side advantage, team from the Netherlands!) have a social data mining product – currently available for companies only, but I’d buy a personal license as soon as it becomes available (possibly end of this year I hear…)
  • TalentBin of the US were worthy winners (imho, based on the tech they’ve built, the solidity of business model and the commercial progress made) – if I was a dev-focussed recruiter, I’d buy this over almost any other product)

Actual companies aside though, my main observation concerns those not in the room.  The contest was held in the main auditorium.  I reckon there were around 1,000 people at the conference…  but a large majority were hanging around exhibitor booths and the bar in the conference hall. In the main auditorium for the contest, less than 200.

These were companies from the US, Middle East and Europe who plan to disrupt traditional HR technology over the next 2-5 years. The vast majority of the attendees were either HR buyers or corporate vendor/exhibitors. Those outside the room chose to miss out on a focussed, rapid-fire view of the future.

Are they so secure as to believe the status quo will ensure? If I’d been in either group, I’d have been scouting future purchases, acquisitions, competition, etc. As it was, the bloggers and independent consultants showed the most interest.

Technological change has never hit this pace before. Established markets such as travel, publishing and music are being forced to reinvent in accelerated timescales, from threats they’d never imagined.

HR as an industry needs to wake the hell up and take a good look at the future when the opportunity is so beautifully presented.

Blog: 5 ways to die happier?

In Conference, Personal, Personal Development on October 29, 2012 at 2:43 pm

Over at HRTechEurope last week. Awesome event, especially the Social Enterprise sessions. I have a blog to post on that later, but I wanted to share this short one first.  During one of the sessions, reference was made to a piece by Bronnie Ware, in which she talks about her life in palliative care.  She summarised the five most frequent regrets reported in those last weeks of a patients’ life.

  1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me
  2. I wish I didn’t work so hard
  3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings
  4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends
  5. I wish I had let myself be happier

Regrets of the dyingI don’t yet know in what order I’m going to approach these… but raising my awareness of how each impact my life now can only be a good thing for me and those around me. I hope I have a good few years left on this planet and I plan on doing something with them.

The original post is here.

Choose happiness.

Blog: Talent communities vs the natural world

In Community, Conference, Guest post, Recruitment, Social Recruiting on July 12, 2012 at 8:07 am

Originally written as a guest post for #SRConf, now here for my archives.

I’ve heard previously that the idea of community very much underpins education (and therefore talent) since the dawn of human development. Interesting concept, plenty of historical evidence.

Sitting on the beach recently, feeding seagulls with my kids it prompted me to consider how we develop Talent Communities. We talk of seeding with content, of talent attraction, of using these mechanisms to identify the rarer candidate.

We debate the value of the community manager, the role such a person should play. A brief experiment made it simple to draw some very fundamental conclusions. First, a short video (no, not the beach… maybe next time!)

Some observations:

  • Seeding (feeding) can have a pretty immediate impact (if the food is right!)
  • Attraction continues via signals we’re not always aware of
  • While the main contingent can probably be predicted, it’s the unusual arrival that may prove more interesting
  • Interest dies away without continuing new food/content
  • Finally – the unexpected can cause the very sudden disintegration of a community

Is there more to be found here? For me, some of these basic principles can provide guidance for us as we explore and evolve. Keeping it simple can indeed be effective!

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