James Mayes

Archive for the ‘Human Resources’ Category

Sporting analogy… why Talent matters via #hrtecheurope

In Conference, Human Resources, Recruitment, Sport on March 20, 2013 at 12:30 pm

Listening to a great presentation from Mike Psenka of eThority Analytics at HRTech Europe’s spring warm up event.  He’s looking at workforce analytics, performance data and so on.

This slide looks at difference in sporting achievement between 1908 and 2012. Performance improvements over this period for high jump and 100m race were 22-23%. The impact of human evolution is demonstrably minimal. In the equipment section, the winner of the race in the second picture is missing a shoe – so equipment is not necessarily the key differentiator.  In the third section, we see the vast difference in pool available.

Strong correlation? I think so!

Talent identification

 

 

Blog: Universal Jobmatch… or UK Government vs Monster?

In Human Resources, Recruitment, Start-ups on November 7, 2012 at 1:25 pm

universal jobmatchFollowing a great presentation by Tom Loosemore recently, I’ve been keen to take a better look at what’s happening with gov.uk, the UK Government’s new central portal. It aims to be simpler, faster, cheaper… and save us all from the hell that was DirectGov. That said, while the front end looks better it still requires use of the Government Gateway service – from my own perspective of submitting tax returns, that ain’t a pretty thing!

One strand of the project is Universal Jobmatch. From a Government perspective, it sits within the DWP – which from a public perspective, typically means the traditional Job Centre.  Universal Jobmatch launches 19th November. At that point, companies who had previously approached job centres to find candidates will find these roles available on this new site. In addition however, all those registered with the DWP as jobseekers will be required to register. The ONS currently records over 2.5m people as registered jobseekers.

An enforced candidate database of 2.5m on launch? NOT BAD!

The site will allow open access to recruiters and employers and will incorporate skill matching technology.  I’ve not been able to ascertain what kind of technology is being implemented for the matching, but candidates will be able to upload up to five CV’s (one public, four for private applications to companies). Auto alerts are also included, though again, I’m unclear on whether these are employer specific, candidate specific or both.

I’ve reached out for further information, but so far have had only a cursory conversation.  The line that really caught me?

“Think of it as Monster, delivered by Government”.

Following on from Jamie’s post this week on the Death of the Paid-For Job Posting, a number of comments suggested the lower end of the labour market would continue to thrive. This looks like a fairly sizeable threat to me! I don’t believe this poses much of a threat to the higher end of the market, but at the lower end, this could certainly have an impact.

If anyone has more info or thoughts, be delighted to see it. Haven’t seen anything on this in the blogosphere yet…

UPDATE

Been pointed to some early marketing information (text below is cut n paste)

– placing jobs and receiving a shortlist of suitable jobseekers

– reviewing the jobs you are advertising

– reviewing the CVs matched to your jobs

– selecting the jobseekers you want to apply for jobs

– explore the number of potential jobseeker matches before posting a job

– and, receive an anonymous list ranked by best match first.

UPDATE 14th Nov 2013

A couple of links have come my way, offering an FAQ sheet for both candidates and employers. Hope you find them useful!

Why doesn’t HR care about disruptive technology? #hrtecheurope

In Conference, Human Resources, Recruitment, Software Development, Start-ups on October 30, 2012 at 5:49 pm

Over at HRTechEurope last week and as per the previous year, one of my highlights was the iHR contest. A handful of young tech firms with the potential to disrupt get a time-limited “pitch n demo” opportunity, with points awarded from analysts and VC’s. All obviously get some great exposure and while the winner is by no means guaranteed success, it certainly can’t hurt.

I know I can fall prone to living in a social/recruiting tech bubble and that my news feed is heavily US/UK biased.  I therefore take this as a great opportunity to look at things either from the wider HR market, or from regions which perhaps I don’t watch as carefully as I might. There were certainly a couple of competitors who stood out for me:

  • IntuneX of Finland have some fascinating ideas which I want to research further
  • ScioMino (home side advantage, team from the Netherlands!) have a social data mining product – currently available for companies only, but I’d buy a personal license as soon as it becomes available (possibly end of this year I hear…)
  • TalentBin of the US were worthy winners (imho, based on the tech they’ve built, the solidity of business model and the commercial progress made) – if I was a dev-focussed recruiter, I’d buy this over almost any other product)

Actual companies aside though, my main observation concerns those not in the room.  The contest was held in the main auditorium.  I reckon there were around 1,000 people at the conference…  but a large majority were hanging around exhibitor booths and the bar in the conference hall. In the main auditorium for the contest, less than 200.

These were companies from the US, Middle East and Europe who plan to disrupt traditional HR technology over the next 2-5 years. The vast majority of the attendees were either HR buyers or corporate vendor/exhibitors. Those outside the room chose to miss out on a focussed, rapid-fire view of the future.

Are they so secure as to believe the status quo will ensure? If I’d been in either group, I’d have been scouting future purchases, acquisitions, competition, etc. As it was, the bloggers and independent consultants showed the most interest.

Technological change has never hit this pace before. Established markets such as travel, publishing and music are being forced to reinvent in accelerated timescales, from threats they’d never imagined.

HR as an industry needs to wake the hell up and take a good look at the future when the opportunity is so beautifully presented.

Twitter, customer service and employee trust – @SouthernRailUK

In Human Resources, Social Media, Twitter on October 24, 2012 at 10:56 am
So on route to #trulondon this morning, my train was running both late and over-crowded.  My ticket was valid, but not for first class. The entire train was packed, standing room too, except first class – completely empty.  No guard or conductor in sight to check with, so I just jumped in and settled down to work.
At this point, I thought I’d tweet the rail operator. Partially because they claim to provide customer service on Twitter which I wanted to test, but also because if I was going to get grief (or even fined!) I wanted to check that situation out quickly. I got a swift response, which was at least a partial result – though it only expressed some light regret at the situation rather than offering anything more constructive. I followed up, making my concerns a little clearer regards how a ticket inspector might react. At this point, the official account stopped replying… first failure point.
A third party jumped in to defend the role of the ticket inspector. Clearly s/he was trying to defend the poor inspector who probably finds themselves on the sharp end of disgruntled customers regularly, but I was intrigued. A quick scan revealed the user regularly responded to other Southern Rail customers, defending the staff.
A little further correspondence reveals yes, s/he is a railway insider – who thinks of the customer service staff on Twitter as being “parrots”.
Railway Customer Service
The exchange being concluded, a few thoughts:
  1. If you’re going to offer customer service on Twitter (or any other online platform) offer something USEFUL. “We’re sorry for the screw-up” doesn’t quite go far enough, in person or on line.
  2. If your own staff don’t respect your efforts to monitor and respond, what makes you think the general public will?
  3. The user finished by asking me to delete the tweets concerned, suggesting a culture of fear/blame exists. Why else would removal be requested….?
  4. Sitting on a train mid-discussion with an HR person who believes strongly in Employer Transparency… Irony?
The identity of the user in the screenshots is obscured for obvious reasons and original tweets deleted.
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